Question: What Does Polio Do To Legs?

Does polio cause muscle atrophy?

Most often, polio survivors start to experience gradual new weakening in muscles that were previously affected by the polio infection.

The most common symptoms include slowly progressive muscle weakness, fatigue (both generalized and muscular), and a gradual decrease in the size of muscles (muscle atrophy)..

Where did polio originally come from?

1894, first outbreak of polio in epidemic form in the U.S. occurs in Vermont, with 132 cases. 1908, Karl Landsteiner and Erwin Popper identify a virus as the cause of polio by transmitting the disease to a monkey.

Can you get polio from swimming?

We now know that polio is spread through a fecal-oral contact route, and almost always through contaminated water.

Can a person get polio twice?

Does past infection with polio make a person immune? There are three types of polio virus. Lifelong immunity usually depends on which type of virus a person contracts. Second attacks are rare and result from infection with a polio virus of a different type than the first attack.

Can polio affect offspring?

When women had poliomyelitis during a pregnancy, more miscarriages and stillbirths were observed, as was paralysis of the newborn ( congenital polio). The vaccines for polio are made up of inactivated viruses and, if given in pregnancy, do not seem to cause any harm to the developing embryo or fetus.

What damage does Polio do to the body?

Polio, or poliomyelitis, is a disabling and life-threatening disease caused by the poliovirus. The virus spreads from person to person and can infect a person’s spinal cord, causing paralysis (can’t move parts of the body).

What are the causes of polio?

What causes poliomyelitis? The poliovirus spreads most often from fecal-oral contact. Usually, this occurs from poor hand washing or from consuming of contaminated food or water. Sneezing or coughing also spreads the virus.

How long do polio survivors live?

For years, most polio survivors lived active lives, their memory of polio mainly forgotten, their health status stable. But by the late 1970s, survivors who were 20 or more years past their original diagnosis began noting new problems, including fatigue, pain, breathing or swallowing problems, and additional weakness.

What is the life expectancy of someone with polio?

Is it serious? The risk of lifelong paralysis is very serious. Even children who seem to fully recover can develop new muscle pain, weakness, or paralysis as adults, 15 to 40 years later. About 2 to 10 children out of 100 who have paralysis from polio die because the virus affects the muscles that help them breathe.

What is the key symptom of polio?

Common signs and symptoms include: Progressive muscle or joint weakness and pain. Fatigue. Muscle wasting (atrophy)

Does polio get worse with age?

Symptoms vary from mild, flu-like symptoms to paralysis and possibly death. People who have had polio may experience effects later in life called the late effects of polio. The late effects of polio are when physical symptoms return 15 years or more after the first polio infection.

Can you recover from polio paralysis?

Recovery from minor polio occurs in about three days. The fever and other symptoms of paralytic polio can go away within days, but paralysis can be permanent. Some muscle function may return during the first six months after the acute illness, and improvement can continue for two years.