Quick Answer: How Many Articles Are There In The Treaty Of Waitangi?

Who refused the Treaty of Waitangi?

Tāraia NgākutiTāraia Ngākuti, a chief of Ngāti Tamaterā in the Coromandel, was one of many notable chiefs who refused to sign the Treaty of Waitangi.

Tāraia was a famous warrior and may have felt that signing would be beneath him..

What are the main points of the Treaty of Waitangi?

The Treaty aimed to protect the rights of Māori to keep their land, forests, fisheries and treasures while handing over sovereignty to the English. One version of the Treaty was written in Māori and one in English and these two versions of the Treaty can be interpreted to mean different things.

How many chiefs did not sign the treaty?

Altogether, over 500 chiefs had signed. Hobson sent the British government copies of the Treaty in Māori and English. Hobson did not have the signatures of every Māori leader in the country. While some had refused to sign, others hadn’t even had the chance – the Treaty hadn’t been taken to their region.

What were the consequences of the Treaty of Waitangi?

What issues of injustice arose from the Treaty of Waitangi? Land ownership created many problems for race relations. British officials had a very inconsistent approach, which led to uncertainty over policy. For Māori, land was integral to their culture and pre-Treaty land purchases were to be re-examined.

How many copies of the Treaty of Waitangi are there?

nine copiesHow many copies are there of the Treaty, and which one is used? There are nine copies of the Treaty at Archives New Zealand, including the Treaty in Māori signed on 6 February 1840. All but one of these copies is written in longhand, and only one is in English.

What is Article 2 of the Treaty of Waitangi?

Article 2 provides for land sales to be effected through the Crown. This gave the Crown the right of pre-emption in land sales.

Why is the Treaty of Waitangi so important?

Why the Treaty is important The Treaty governs the relationship between Māori – the tangata whenua (indigenous people) – and everyone else, and ensures the rights of both Māori and Pakeha (non-Māori) are protected. It does that by: … making the Government responsible for helping to address grievances.

What does the Treaty of Waitangi mean today?

The Treaty of Waitangi was signed in 1840 and was an agreement between the British Crown and a large number of Māori chiefs. Today the Treaty is widely accepted to be a constitutional document that establishes and guides the relationship between the Crown in New Zealand (embodied by our government) and Māori.

What does HAPU mean?

In Māori and New Zealand English, a hapū (“subtribe”, or “clan”) functions as “the basic political unit within Māori society”.

What if there was no Treaty of Waitangi?

So: what if there had been no Treaty of Waitangi? … Another easy answer is that with no treaty there would be no argument about whether, in signing the treaty, iwi ceded sovereignty, as the English version says. In the te reo version they didn’t.

What are the 4 principles of the Treaty of Waitangi?

Treaty principles.Quality improvement.Knowledge.Leadership.Planning, resourcing and evaluation.Outcome/performance measures and monitoring.

What did the Treaty of Waitangi agree to?

The Treaty of Waitangi is an agreement made in 1840 between representatives of the British Crown and more than 500 Māori chiefs. It resulted in the declaration of British sovereignty over New Zealand by Lieutenant-Governor William Hobson in May 1840. Most chiefs signed a Māori-language version of the treaty.

What are the 3 principles of the Treaty of Waitangi?

The three “P’s”, as they are often referred to, are the principles of partnership, participation and protection. These underpin the relationship between the Government and Māori under the Treaty of Waitangi. These principles are derived from the underlying tenets of the Treaty.

What does the Treaty of Waitangi contain?

Treaty to establish a British Governor of New Zealand, consider Māori ownership of their lands and other properties, and give Māori the rights of British subjects. Waitangi in the Bay of Islands, and various other locations in New Zealand.

What is Article One of the Treaty of Waitangi?

Kawanatanga – Article 1 provides for the Government to govern, though not in isolation from other provisions of the Treaty of Waitangi. The right to govern is qualified by an obligation to protect Māori interests. This aspect of the agreement is further established within the other articles of the Treaty.