When Should I See An Orthopedic For Foot Pain?

When should I see a podiatrist for foot pain?

If you have any issues that involve the foot and or ankle—a sports injury, arthritis/joint pain, skin problems, etc.

—a visit to the podiatrist is your best bet.

A podiatrist is a specialist who manages and treats almost all symptoms that involve the ankle and/or the foot..

When should I see an orthopedist?

Patients might need an orthopedic physician if they have: Joint or musculoskeletal pain that began after an injury. Gradually progressive hip or knee pain that is worse with weight bearing. Joint pain that is severe and interfering with function. Moderate or advanced arthritis of the knee or hip.

Do I need a referral to see an orthopedic?

Most of the time, though, insurance companies do require that you speak with your primary care provider and receive a written referral before seeing an orthopedic specialist. Even if your insurance company doesn’t require it, it’s wise to talk to your PCP first in order to see if a visit to a specialist is necessary.

How do I know if my foot pain is serious?

Seek immediate medical attention if you:Have severe pain or swelling.Have an open wound or a wound that is oozing pus.Have signs of infection, such as redness, warmth and tenderness in the affected area or you have a fever over 100 F (37.8 C)Are unable to walk or put weight on your foot.More items…

DO orthopedic doctors treat foot pain?

Both podiatrists and orthopaedic surgeons are qualified to treat foot and ankle conditions, surgically and non-surgically. In general, the best bet is to choose the doctor you feel the most comfortable with, or who has the most experience treating your particular condition.

Can foot pain be a sign of heart problems?

Distance from the Heart One reason your feet can develop problems is because of the distance that they are away from your heart. When the heart’s pumping is strained by something like peripheral arterial disease, it reduces the flow of blood to your feet, making them hurt or making them swollen.

Should I see a podiatrist or orthopedist for foot pain?

Because orthopedic surgeons focus more on the entire body, podiatrists may spend more time addressing solely foot and ankle problems during their time in residency. A podiatrist is more likely to treat your pain or discomfort with a conservative approach, resorting to surgery as a last resort.

What is the difference between podiatrist and orthopedic?

Orthopedic surgeons and podiatrists work side by side in hospitals and in the same group practices. The main difference lies in the body systems they treat. Orthopedic surgeons are concerned with bones, muscles, ligaments and joints throughout the body. … Podiatrists are foot and ankle doctors and surgeons.

What can an orthopedic doctor do for plantar fasciitis?

In the majority of cases, plantar fasciitis is treated non-surgically. Rest, ice, and over-the-counter anti-inflammatory or prescription medications can help ease symptoms. Cortisone injections may also be used. It can be helpful to lose weight and not go barefoot.

Should I see a podiatrist or orthopedist for Achilles tendonitis?

For foot and ankle care, podiatrists and orthopedists are both qualified medical specialists you can consult. The best choice is to go for a podiatrist who has extensive experience diagnosing, treating, and preventing foot and ankle disorders.

What can orthopedic doctors diagnose?

WHAT IS AN ORTHOPAEDIC SURGEON? Orthopaedic surgeons are devoted to the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disorders of the bones, joints, ligaments, tendons and muscles. Some orthopaedists are generalists, while others specialize in certain areas of the body, such as: Hip and knee.

What can a podiatrist do for foot pain?

Podiatrists often treat ingrown toenails, calluses, fallen arches, heel spurs and problems related to abuse or injury. They may employ surgical methods and may also treat such underlying health issues as diabetes, provided they are related to the foot or ankle problem.

Why does my foot hurt on the bottom?

Plantar fasciitis is an inflammation of the fibrous tissue (plantar fascia) along the bottom of your foot that connects your heel bone to your toes. Plantar fasciitis can cause intense heel pain. Plantar fasciitis (PLAN-tur fas-e-I-tis) is one of the most common causes of heel pain.

Should I see a podiatrist or orthopedist for plantar fasciitis?

In the infrequent occasion that at-home treatment methods or therapies provided by your podiatrist don’t help your plantar fasciitis pain, your podiatrist may refer to an orthopedic surgeon to pursue surgical methods as a last resort.

What conditions can Podiatrists treat?

Podiatrists treat people of any age for many foot-related conditions, including:Fractures and sprains. Podiatrists regularly treat these common injuries when they affect a foot or ankle. … Bunions and hammertoes. … Diabetes. … Arthritis. … Growing pains. … Heel pain. … Morton’s neuroma.

What is foot pain a sign of?

Injury, overuse or conditions causing inflammation involving any of the bones, ligaments or tendons in the foot can cause foot pain. Arthritis is a common cause of foot pain. Injury to the nerves of the feet may result in intense burning pain, numbness or tingling (peripheral neuropathy).

What can cause foot pain without injury?

Other potential causes of foot pain include:corns.calluses.bunions.warts.ingrown toenails.medications that cause swelling of the feet.Morton’s neuroma, which is a thickening around the nerve tissue between toes near the ball of the foot.hammer toes.More items…•

Can an orthopedic doctor treat plantar fasciitis?

An orthopedic specialist may be able to offer valuable insight into treatment options, especially if your plantar fasciitis is severe or there are other underlying problems with your joints and tissues.

Who should I see if I have foot pain?

A podiatrist is an expert on every part of the foot. See a podiatrist if you have foot pain or injury. Get urgent medical care if you have any of these symptoms for more than one or two days: severe pain.

What can I expect at an orthopedic appointment?

When you meet with an orthopaedic surgeon for the first time, it is helpful to know what to expect during the orthopedic evaluation. Your first orthopedic appointment will most likely include a comprehensive medical history evaluation, diagnostic imaging (X-rays and/or MRI), and physical tests.

Does plantar fasciitis show up on an MRI?

Even though there is no significant difference between the accuracy of ultrasound and MRI regarding the measurements of the PF thickness [73], MRI is considered as the most sensitive imaging modality for diagnosing plantar fasciitis [74].